Dr.Teruo Higa’s
Living A Dream

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#30 EM Summit


In order to present top level models, EM Summits, responding to various conditions, have followed different formats, sometimes organized as symposia, at other times focused on presentations and case studies. The first EM Summit aimed at making “EMTM models for cities, towns and villages” and was held in Gushikawa City in Okinawa (now Uruma City). The Uruma Municipal Library (former Gushikawa Municipal Library) had been using EMTM in water recycling for over twenty years, had become an historic model for the world, and was regarded as a model solution to the issue of worldwide water resources.

The “EMTM City Development” campaign that began at the same time showed steady results, with 75% of the residents of Uruma City using EMTM. At city hall large quantities of Activated EM-1® were produced so that residents could freely use Activated EM-1®, the city tirelessly called for people to be trained as EMTM leaders, and linked up with the local Community Activity Center, which is the focal point for community outreach in the city.

As a result, residents became much more aware of how to “EMTM-ize” their lives, and among communities in Japan with a population of between 100,000 and 500,000 Uruma City had by far the lowest per capita output of garbage; it has been the best in Japan in this category for five straight years, including this year. Residents have gotten in the habit of recycling kitchen garbage in their vegetable gardens, and there has been an increase in the number of residents who grow all their own vegetables with no pesticides and using organic fertilizer. This had led to improved health and an increase in the number of elderly residents working as volunteers.

Starting with the second EM Summit the focus turned to cleaning the oceans, specifically cleaning the Inland Sea, Mikawa Bay, and Ise Bay; more and more it is a commonly held notion that EMTM can be used to clean the bodies of water. Last year we held a forum-type summit that focused on the Nihonbashi River in Tokyo. Within one year the Nihonbashi River became clean, as did the main tributary, the Kanda River, and the branch flowing downstream from the Koishikawa Bridge. This year, the third year since we started putting Activated EM-1® in the water, we’ve even come across the occasional school of ayu (fresh water trout) in both the Nihonbashi and Kanda Rivers.

Ten tons of Activated EM-1® are put into the Nihonbashi River each week, totally over 1500 tons of EM-1®, plus approximately 240,000 EMTM mudballs have been thrown into the entire water system. As a result Hamarikyu and the part of Hamamatsu-cho along the monorail line, both on the south side of Tokyo Bay, have become clean. From Haneda Airport the current changes directions, and even the area around Odaiba Seaside Park has started to become cleaner.

The Ninth EM Summit Kinki in Nara

The achievements of U-Net (United Networks for Earth Environment) and other groups around Japan, including the movement to clean up the Nihonbashi River, are accelerating on a number of fronts. EMTM’s turn to shine comes when conditions, including the environment, are really bad, and as Japan is entering an era when conditions are increasingly bad, resistance to EMTM is nearly non-existent.

Thanks to the efforts of people in the Nara City office, which has always been supportive of EMTM, as well as local U-Net representatives, a project was begun to clean up the Kagami Ike (“mirror pond”) at the Todaiji temple, revive the frail pine trees (about 150 of them) at the south main gate of the temple complex, and deal with the issue of animal waste from deer. Seeing as how this complex is designated as a national treasure, is a world heritage site, and is the head temple of the Kegon sect of Buddhism, we needed to bring about the best possible results, in keeping with the importance of the site.

The site that the temple manages, which in the past covered some 1.32 million square meters, is now been reduced to 330,000 sq. meters, but still it is quite an extensive area, with numerous related facilities; due to the effects of the deer and acid rain the overall environment had grown fragile. EMTM activities began with volunteers, and as good results were achieved, the temple authorities established a system that not only used EMTM to manage the pond and the pines, but to revitalize the entire site. An “EM-1® Activation Unit” (Sold only in Japan and functions like a fermenter) was brought in to make large quantities of Activated EM-1®, and a system was put in place whereby three people are always working to apply EMTM to the site. This system makes it easy for those involved to apply EMTM in various ways, including the recycling of organic waste and environmental activities with the children attending the kindergarten affiliated with the temple.

In this magazine I have already introduced some of the achievements we attained at the Todaiji, but one thing to note is how fireflies, which were quite scarce, are now flying all over, and pleuroceridae (small to medium-sized freshwater snails) are found in great numbers everywhere. This is the result of making a concerted effort to use EM TM, and using EMTM fermented food waste mixed in with their food source. All technical aspects of the project have been handled by Mr. Oka of the EM TM Otasuke Net group.

O ring tests and stretching exercises done to show improved flexibility in people as they stand in the area reveals that the Todaiji temple is now the vortex for some powerful energy. When tourists and worshippers spend even one-two hours at Todaiji temple, they feel totally refreshed, and feel as if all their prayers will come true. Not only has the deterioration of various culturally important buildings and facilities at the compound been checked, but if EMTM is applied even more thoroughly in the daily supervision of the site, it will not be difficult at all to revive these buildings, just as the pond and the pines have been revived.

I am confident that this type of system at Todaiji will allow it, as a national treasure, as a world heritage site, and as the head temple of the Kegon sect, to play a new role in response to the demands of the times. If the same system were to spread to all the Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples in Japan, this will lead to an even higher level of activity to aid humanity, and I would expect this to be a wonderful opportunity for the dream of Japan to be a kind of heaven on earth to become a reality.

At this year’s summit we heard a presentation from Mr. Yoshida from the Tango Peninsula on projects to clean the Amanohashidatte and the Aso Sea areas; he reported that he is confident that if the EMTM activities of people in a broad region are linked together, these areas will definitely become clean. Mr. Sonoi of Wakayama reported on the achievements he’s made in revitalizing the local region through EMTM model projects that fulfill the dream he’s had since he was young to build an ecologically-sound culture, based on co-existence and co-prosperity, with agriculture as its hub. The methods he outlined not only have the power to help deal decisively with issues such as our aging society and the decline in the rural population, but also to serve as a strong anchor for such an ecologically-sound culture.

Mr. Nakai of Mita City reported on various techniques he’s learned enjoying using EMTM to grow vegetables and flowers for his family. This presentation showed the starting point for all EMTM activities, namely that through them people find enjoyment and happiness, create enjoyment and happiness, and share these with many others.

 Among presentations from overseas participants were ones by Mr. Francis Reyes from Peru, who reported on businesses aimed at helping poor Peruvian farmers become independent; and a report from Mr. Amilcar Salgado Lopez, of Colombia, who reported on how the town of Cajica, next to Bogota, with a population of 50,000, recycles 100% of its organic waste using EMTM. These are all models that are valid for anywhere in the world and quite fitting reports for this year’s summit.


The Ninth EM Summit Kinki in Nara, which began on November 22.

The Todaiji temple, registered as a World Heritage site, is actively using EMTM.

The Kagami Ike (mirror pond) at Todaiji, one year after using EMTM. The water quality has improved so much that, as its name implies, it reflects the grand Buddhist hall now, and all odor is gone.

The day after the EM Summit the staff of the Temple Affairs Office and Dr. Higa led a tour of Todaiji.

Approximately 1,100 people attended the Ninth EM Summit Kinki in Nara. The attendees heard numerous outstanding case studies from the Kinki region.

Courtesy of Ecopure

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