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#138 Diverse applications of charcoal

#138 Diverse applications of charcoal
Diverse applications of charcoal

In general, charcoal is porous and has various properties such as moisture retention, adsorption, reduction (antioxidation), and can act as a catalyst. In addition, depending on the firing temperature, it can be everything from strongly acidic to strongly alkaline, and can also be an insulator, a semiconductor, or a conductor. The physicochemical properties of charcoal function in a quantum manner (meaning it changes to anything), so its applications are infinite.

However, it is not easy to sustain the effects of charcoal in a stable way. In other words, a first experiment using charcoal may produce what can be seen as miraculous result, but these degrade over time, and soon return to their original state.

In other words, adsorbing contamination leads to a functional decline. Generally, when used for a long period, continuous washing and drying are repeated to remove contamination and allow it to be reused, but this raises the issue of cost when compared with buying new charcoal.

A typical example is activated carbon used for the deodorization at a sewage pumping station. By adsorbing a small percent of EM stock solution, the activated carbon will function semi-permanently, something that has already been put into practical use. This is because EM uses the adsorbed contaminants as a substrate (food) and thus cleans them up. This technology is the basis for effectively utilizing charcoal for a long time. Also, smokeless carbonizers have begun to use a 1:5-6 solution of activated EM with seawater as a method of fire extinguishing.

The ultimate EM graviton farming method involves using the gravity wave rectification function of EM to positively take in potential energy and utilize it for higher-dimensionalbiological production and producing a revitalized environment. This is the way to reach a technology with infinite possibilities: a sustainable agriculture with no tillage, using no chemical fertilizers or pesticides, producing high yield and high quality, and the ability to purify the air, water, and groundwater.

To that end, we have continued to explore methods that anyone can easily implement, while further enhancing the functionality of charcoal. This originated with measures to deal with the large area contaminated by radiation in Fukushima.

We have already put into practical use underground boundaries using charcoal and salt, and the application of EM graviton rectified stickers in connection with space boundaries, based on transferring this to power charcoal. In other words, the idea is that adsorption of activated EM with seawater by charcoal, to which rectified power has been transferred, can make the most of the quantum properties of the salt mentioned in the previous article, and the quantum properties of the charcoal can be utilized to the fullest.

Generally speaking, making charcoal is quite a large task, but the use of smokeless carbonizer devices makes it very easy to produce ideal agricultural resources from all naturally occurring organic matter.

As long as the purpose is to make use of smokeless carbonizers to create fertilizer-like materials there are no legal issues at all, and the application of the combined technology of EM and salt knows no limits. By using EM graviton rectified stickers, not only charcoal but also all generated ash will have enhanced energy waves (hado), and will change from having semiconductor to superconducting properties.

Photo 1 Dry thoroughly and then incinerate everything from fallen leaves, rice husks,   pruned branches, sawdust, and agricultural waste to make more rectified incinerated ash.

Photo 1 and 2 Add about half to an equal amount of salt and stir well to make a salt charcoal bokashi.
 
◆How to make salt charcoal bokashi
  1.  
  2.     1. Make charcoal. (Photo 1: Using a carbonizer with a diameter of 100cm)
  3.     2. Extinguish with activated EM with seawater. (The amount of charcoal at this time was about 50 liters, about 13kg)
  4.     3. Add charcoal to salt in a ration of 1:0.5 to 1:1. (Photos 2 and 3)
  5.     4. Mix well.
  6.     5. The finished product. (Photo 4)
  7.     Note: It is not necessary to let it ripen. Put it in a fertilizer bag or container, and since salt tends to absorb moisture in places
  8.     with high humidity, keep it in a well-ventilated place, such as a farm equipment storage shed where it won't be exposed to rain.
  9.     With this method, it is easy to spray, salt does not remain on the hands, and it can be applied evenly. It also has excellent weeding
  10.     effects, but also has a high level of integrated fertilizer effects that chemical fertilizers do not attain. (Photos 5,6,7)

          
Photo 1                                                                                                                                     Photo 2

         
Photo 3                                                                                                                                    Photo 4

The amount of charcoal bokashi given to this flower bed is about 200g (about a handful) per 1m2. Regarding application, I think it can be applied about once every two weeks to one month, while checking the condition of the plants.  

          
Photo 5                                                                                                                                    Photo 6

The application of this technology can also turn municipal waste incineration ash and coal ash of coalfired power plants into excellent agricultural resources. One can see this as the basis of a future agricultural revolution.

      Note: By nature, salt is dangerous for agriculture. The positive effects of salt will be seen in fields that contain sufficient organic matter and a healthy balance of microorganisms. When combined with EM bokashi and food waste compost, the effects of salt charcoal bokashi will be enhanced even further.
 
     
  Photo7                                                              
(April 15, 2019)             
 
Courtesy of Ecopure

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